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Vecchio 07-11-2015, 10.53.12   #1
taker_83
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Data registrazione: 10-12-2007
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Predefinito Salute generale e benessere

Apro questa discussione con l'intento di raccogliere informazioni, pareri ed esperienze in merito alla integrazione di vitamine, minerali e/o erbe medicinali utili al benessere generale e salute.
NOTA: la presente discussione vuole essere niente più che un utile scambio di informazioni, studi e considerazioni sul tema della salute. Ovviamente, le informazioni risultanti dal presente 3ad non sono in alcun modo da considerarsi integrative,sostitutive o modificative di prescrizione medica, nè ancor meno devono essere prese in considerazione in assenza di consulto medico


Avrei alcuni spunti relativi alla salute dell'uomo in particolare.

Ho letto della supplementazione - a partire da sopra i 30 anni- di radice di ortica (nettle root) che, secondo alcuni, sarebbe utile nella prevenzione di malattie prostatiche nell'uomo.


Altre sostanze con effetti positivi (secondo alcuni studi) sulla salute:
1-Trans-Resveratrol, vit. d3.
2-vit. b6.
3- adattogeni: ginseng.
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Ultima modifica di taker_83 : 07-11-2015 alle ore 11.56.17.
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Vecchio 07-11-2015, 11.01.55   #2
taker_83
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Overview

Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica and the closely related Urtica urens) has a long medicinal history. In medieval Europe, it was used as a diuretic (to rid the body of excess water) and to treat joint pain.

Stinging nettle has fine hairs on the leaves and stems that contain irritating chemicals, which are released when the plant comes in contact with the skin. The hairs, or spines, of the stinging nettle are normally very painful to the touch. When they come into contact with a painful area of the body, however, they can actually decrease the original pain. Scientists think nettle does this by reducing levels of inflammatory chemicals in the body, and by interfering with the way the body transmits pain signals.

General Uses

Stinging nettle has been used for hundreds of years to treat painful muscles and joints, eczema, arthritis, gout, and anemia. Today, many people use it to treat urinary problems during the early stages of an enlarged prostate (called benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH). It is also used for urinary tract infections, hay fever (allergic rhinitis), or in compresses or creams for treating joint pain, sprains and strains, tendonitis, and insect bites.

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

Stinging nettle root is used widely in Europe to treat BPH. Studies in people suggest that stinging nettle, in combination with other herbs (especially saw palmetto), may be effective at relieving symptoms such as reduced urinary flow, incomplete emptying of the bladder, post urination dripping, and the constant urge to urinate. These symptoms are caused by the enlarged prostate gland pressing on the urethra (the tube that empties urine from the bladder). Some studies suggest that stinging nettle is comparable to finasteride (a medication commonly prescribed for BPH) in slowing the growth of certain prostate cells. However, unlike finasteride, the herb does not decrease prostate size. Scientists aren't sure why nettle root reduces symptoms. It may be because it contains chemicals that affect hormones (including testosterone and estrogen), or because it acts directly on prostate cells. It is important to work with a doctor to treat BPH, and to make sure you have a proper diagnosis to rule out prostate cancer.

Osteoarthritis

The leaves and stems of nettle have been used historically to treat arthritis and relieve sore muscles. Studies have been small and inconclusive, but they do suggest that some people find relief from joint pain by applying nettle leaf topically to the painful area. Other studies show that taking an oral extract of stinging nettle, along with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), allowed people to reduce their NSAID dose.

Hay fever

One preliminary human study suggested that nettle capsules helped reduce sneezing and itching in people with hay fever. In another study, 57% of patients rated nettles as effective in relieving allergies, and 48% said that nettles were more effective than allergy medications they had used previously. Researchers think that may be due to nettle's ability to reduce the amount of histamine the body produces in response to an allergen. More studies are needed to confirm nettle's antihistamine properties. Some doctors recommend taking a freeze-dried preparation of stinging nettle well before hay fever season starts.

Other

Preliminary animal studies indicate that nettle may lower blood sugar and blood pressure. However, more research is needed to determine whether this is also true in humans.

Plant Description

Stinging nettle is the name given to common nettle, garden nettle, and hybrids of these plants. Originally from the colder regions of northern Europe and Asia, this herbaceous shrub grows all over the world today. Stinging nettle grows well in nitrogen-rich soil, blooms between June and September, and usually reaches 2 to 4 feet high.

Stems are upright and rigid. Leaves are heart shaped, finely toothed, and tapered at the ends, and flowers are yellow or pink. The entire plant is covered with tiny stiff hairs, mostly on the underside of the leaves and stem, that release stinging chemicals when touched.

What's It Made Of?

Stinging nettle products are usually made from the leaves and stems, and sometimes the roots. Root preparations are used to relieve symptoms of BPH.

Available Forms

Stinging nettle is available as dried leaf, freeze-dried leaf, extract, capsules, tablets, and as root tincture (a solution of the herb in alcohol), juice, or tea. It also comes in the form of an ointment or cream that can be applied to the skin. The root appears to have different pharmacological effects than the leaves.

How to Take It

Pediatric

Although stinging nettle is available in many combination formulas to treat colds, asthma, and allergies in children, a specific safe and effective dose for children has not yet been established. Talk to your doctor before giving stinging nettle to a child, so the doctor can determine the proper dose.

Adult

Stinging nettle is used in many forms, including as teas, tinctures, fluid extracts, and creams.

Precautions

The use of herbs is a time-honored approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. However, herbs can trigger side effects, and can interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, you should take herbs with care, under the supervision of a health care provider.

Stinging nettle is generally considered safe when used as directed. Occasional side effects include mild stomach upset, fluid retention, sweating, diarrhea, and hives or rash (mainly from topical use). It is important to be careful when handling the nettle plant because touching it can cause an allergic rash. Stinging nettle should never be applied to an open wound.

Because nettle can alter the menstrual cycle and may contribute to miscarriage, pregnant women should not use nettle.

Do not self treat with nettle for BPH. See your doctor to receive a diagnosis and to rule out prostate cancer.

There is some evidence that stinging nettle may raise blood sugar and interfere with diabetes management. There is also evidence that it can lower blood sugar. Patients with diabetes should monitor their blood sugar closely when using stinging nettle.

Stinging nettle can have a diuretic effect. If you have kidney or bladder issues, speak with your health care provider.

Possible Interactions

Antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs (blood thinners) -- Stinging nettle may affect the blood's ability to clot, and could interfere with blood-thinning drugs, including:

Warfarin (Coumadin)
Clopidogrel (Plavix)
Aspirin
Drugs for high blood pressure -- Stinging nettle may lower blood pressure, so it could strengthen the effects of these drugs:

ACE inhibitors: Captopril (Capoten), Elaropril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril), fosinopril (Monopril)
Beta-blockers: Atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), propranolol (Induran)
Calcium channel blockers: Nifedipine (Procardia), amlodipine (Norvasc), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin)
Diuretics (water pills) -- Because stinging nettle can act as a diuretic, it can increase the effects of these drugs, raising the risk of dehydration:

Furosemide (Lasix)
Hydrocholorothiazide
Drugs for diabetes -- Stinging nettle may lower blood sugar, so it could strengthen the effects of these drugs, raising the risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

Lithium -- Stinging nettle may have a diuretic effect and may reduce the body's ability to remove this drug.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) -- In a scientific study of patients with acute arthritis, stewed stinging nettle leaves enhanced the anti-inflammatory effect of diclofenac, an NSAID. Although this effect can reduce pain, talk to your doctor before taking or using stinging nettle if you also take NSAIDs.

Supporting Research

Blumenthal M, Goldberg A, Brinckmann J. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs. Newton, MA: Integrative Medicine Communications; 2000:367-375.

Bone K, Mill S, eds. Principles and Practices of Phytotherapy, Modern Herbal Medicine. London: Churchill Livingstone; 2000.

Chrubasik JE, Roufogalis BD, Wagner H, Chrubasik S. A comprehensive review on the stinging nettle effect and efficacy profiles. Part II: urticae radix. Phytomedicine. 2007;14:568-79.

Ernst E, Chrubasik S. Phyto–anti-inflammatories. A systematic review of randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials. Rheum Dis Clin North Am. 2000;26:13-27.

Helms S, Miller A. Natural treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis. Altern Med Rev. 2006;11:196-207.

Johnson TA, Sohn J, Inman WD, Bjeldanes LF, Rayburn K. Lipophilic stinging nettle extracts possess potent antiinflammatory activity, are not cytotoxic and may be superior to traditional tinctures for treating inflammatory disorders. Phytomedicine. 2013; 20:143-7.

Koch E. Extracts from fruits of saw palmetto (Sabal serrulata) and roots of stinging nettle (Urtica dioica): viable alternatives in the medical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and associated lower urinary tract symptoms. Planta Med. 2001;67:489-500.

Konrad L, Muller HH, Lenz C, Laubinger H, Aumuller G, Lichius JJ. Antiproliferative effect on human prostate cancer cells by a stinging nettle root (Urtica dioica) extract. Planta Med. 2000;66:44-7.

Lopatkin NA, Sivkov AV, Medvedev AA, Walter K, Schlefke S, Avdeichuk IuI, et al. Combined extract of Sabal palm and nettle in the treatment of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms in double blind, placebo-controlled trial. Urologiia. 2006;:12, 14-9.

Nahata A. Ameliorative effects of stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) on testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in rats. Andrologia. 2012; 44:396-409.

Pittler MH. Complementary therapies for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia. FACT. 2000;5:255-257.

Popa G, Hagele-Kaddour H, Walther C. Efficacy of a combined Sabal-urtica preparation in the symptomatic treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Results of a placebo-controlled double-blind study. MMW Fortschr Med. 2005;147 Suppl 3:103-8.

Rakel D. Integrative Medicine, 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders;2012:70.

Randall C, Randall H, Dobbs F, Hutton C, Sanders H. Randomized controlled trial of nettle sting for treatment of base-of-thumb pain. J R Soc Med. 2000;93:305-309.

Safarinejad MR. Urtica dioica for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. J Herb Pharmacother. 2005;5:1-11.

Schneider T, Rubben H. Stinging nettle root extract (Bazoton-uno) in long term treatment of benign prostatic syndrome (BPS). Results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled multicenter study after 12 months. Urologe A. 2004;43:302-6.

Schulze-Tanzil G, de SP, Behnke B, Klingelhoefer S, Scheid A, Shakibaei M. Effects of the antirheumatic remedy hox alpha – a new stinging nettle leaf extract – on matrix metalloproteinases in human chondrocytes in vitro. Histol Histopathol 2002;17:477-485.

Tarhan O, Alacacioglu A, Somali I, Sipahi H, Zencir M, Oztop I, Dirioz M, Yilmaz U. Complementary-alternative medicine among cancer patients in the western region of Turkey. J BUON. 2009;14:265-9.

Wilt TJ, Ishani A, Rutks I, MacDonald R. Phytotherapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Public Health Nutr. 2000;3:459-472.


Articolo tratto da: https://umm.edu/health/medical/altme...tinging-nettle
__________________
Moderation in bodybuilding is a vice, moderation in discipline is a failure. (Dorian Yates)

Successful individuals view mistakes as valuable tools for self-correction that motivate them to actively seek the knowledge necessary for further mastery. (Mike Mentzer)

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Vecchio 07-11-2015, 11.04.17   #3
taker_83
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Data registrazione: 10-12-2007
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Predefinito Resveratrolo

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3936154/

The anti–cancer potential of resveratrol has been well documented in many in vitro and in vivo studies. Down–regulation of androgen receptor and synergy with flutamide, as well as enhancement of radiosensitivity are the most interesting properties in treatment of prostate cancer.

Resveratrol has displayed a potential as prostate cancer chemoprevention in both in vitro and animal model studies.

Resveratrol is well–tolerated, but an optimal dose has not yet been determined.

There are no results from human clinical trials on therapeutic effects of resveratrol in prostate diseases. Despite promising results from many studies, published evidence is not strong enough to justify chronic administration of resveratrol to humans.
__________________
Moderation in bodybuilding is a vice, moderation in discipline is a failure. (Dorian Yates)

Successful individuals view mistakes as valuable tools for self-correction that motivate them to actively seek the knowledge necessary for further mastery. (Mike Mentzer)

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Vecchio 07-11-2015, 11.05.50   #4
taker_83
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Data registrazione: 10-12-2007
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Predefinito Vit. D3

J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2013 Jul;136:233-7. doi:

10.1016/j.jsbmb.2012.11.012. Epub 2012 Dec 7.

Vitamin D3 supplementation, low-risk prostate cancer, and health disparities.
Hollis BW1, Marshall DT, Savage SJ, Garrett-Mayer E, Kindy MS, Gattoni-Celli S.


Abstract
Vitamin D promotes the differentiation of prostate cancer cells, raising the possibility that vitamin D deficiency over time may contribute to the progression from subclinical prostate cancer to clinical disease. Since low-risk prostate cancers are monitored over time in an effort to determine which progress into clinically important, more aggressive cancers, they provide an excellent model in which to study, over an extended period of time, the effects of enhancing vitamin D status and related changes in tumor progression. This is particularly relevant to African-American men, who exhibit a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency as well as higher incidence of prostate cancer and higher mortality rates from prostate cancer than Caucasians. Our research team has recently completed an open-label clinical trial aimed at assessing the safety and potential efficacy of vitamin D3 supplementation at 4000 international units (IU) per day for one year in subjects diagnosed with early stage, low-risk prostate cancer. The results of this clinical study suggest that supplementation with vitamin D3 at 4000IU per day may benefit patients with early stage, low-risk prostate cancer on active surveillance, because of the improved outcome (a decreased number of positive cores at repeat biopsy) in more than half of the subjects enrolled in the trial. We also observed that, after one year of supplementation, there was no difference in circulating levels of vitamin D between African-American and Caucasian subjects who completed the study. These clinical results also suggest that robust and sustained vitamin D3 supplementation can reduce prostate cancer-related health disparities in African-American men and that these health disparities are at least in part the result of widespread hypovitaminosis D within the African-American population. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Vitamin D Workshop'.
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Moderation in bodybuilding is a vice, moderation in discipline is a failure. (Dorian Yates)

Successful individuals view mistakes as valuable tools for self-correction that motivate them to actively seek the knowledge necessary for further mastery. (Mike Mentzer)


Ultima modifica di taker_83 : 07-11-2015 alle ore 11.07.52.
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Vecchio 07-11-2015, 11.35.29   #5
taker_83
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Data registrazione: 10-12-2007
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Predefinito Ginseng

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3659610/

Effects of Panax ginseng in Neurodegenerative Diseases

CONCLUSION
P. ginseng has been used for thousands of years as a traditional medicine in Asian countries. P. ginseng has extensive pharmacological actions and specific mechanism in the CNS. The major active ingredients of P. ginseng, ginsenosides, exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and anti-apoptotic mechanisms and exert various effects involving stress and the immune system in the nervous system. Rd, Re, and Rg1 are effective in treatment of PD and Rb1, Rg1-3, Re, and Rh2 are effective in the treatment of AD. Based on the increasing literature regarding neuroprotective effects, P. ginseng and ginsenosides may potentially be useful as dugs for the treatment of PD and AD. However, how these neuroprotective effects relate to the structures of the ginsenoside is still not yet fully understood. Further neurological studies should include the mechanisms of action in more detail with emphasis on specificity and the relationship between structure and function. The prevalence of HD, ALS, and MS are also increasing. However, little is known of the physiological and pharmacological actions of P. ginseng and ginsenosides in these neurological disorders. Future neurological studies involving P. ginseng and ginsenosides should include the therapeutic studies in both animal and human models for these diseases.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3659612/

Ginseng, the 'Immunity Boost': The Effects of Panax ginseng on Immune System

CONCLUDING REMARKS
Here we discussed the current knowledge on the effects of ginseng on immune system (Table 1). Although ample studies have examined the immunomodulatory properties of ginseng in vitro and in animals, most of them are limited to assess the phenotypic changes at the cellular level, and only a few studies have looked at the alterations by ginseng at the molecular level. For example, cytokine secretion, antibody production, surface marker expression, and cellular functions such as phagocytosis and cytotoxicity were common criteria to evaluate immunoregulatory properties, while molecular components involved in signaling pathway were rarely investigated. In order to reveal the underlying molecular mechanisms for the immunomodulating effects of ginseng in more detail, further in-depth studies need to be provided.


Summary of the ginseng effects on immune system
As a well-known herbal immune stimulant, hundreds of studies have extensively reported the anti-cancer or chemopreventive effects of ginseng. The anti-cancer effects of ginseng are mainly through the improvements in cell-mediated immunity consisting of cytotoxic T cells and NK cells, while other mechanisms such as oxidative stress, apoptosis, and angiogenesis are also involved. A comprehensive review dealing with anti-cancer effects from the immunological point of view would be imperative in the near future.



http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3446728/

Pharmacological Effects of Ginseng on Liver Functions and Diseases: A Minireview

Conclusions

Ginseng and its principal components, ginsenoisdes, have shown a wide array of pharmacological activities including beneficial role in the regulation of liver functions and the treatment of liver disorders of acute/chronic hepatotoxicity, hepatitis, hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis, liver hepatectomy, liver transplantation, and even liver failure and HCC. The possible activity pathways of the actions have been also investigated. There is increasing attention to the effects of ginseng on the liver functions. However, more detailed molecular mechanisms of the activities of ginseng/ginsenoisdes as well as further efficacy and safety studies remain to be explored.

It is another important area for further research and development to combine ginseng with other liver active drugs to investigate their possible synergic efficacy and preferably pharmacological properties.

Taken together, accumulating evidence supports the potential of ginseng in the treatment of the hepatic diseases and further studies will facilitate their application so far.
__________________
Moderation in bodybuilding is a vice, moderation in discipline is a failure. (Dorian Yates)

Successful individuals view mistakes as valuable tools for self-correction that motivate them to actively seek the knowledge necessary for further mastery. (Mike Mentzer)

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Vecchio 07-11-2015, 11.43.26   #6
taker_83
Get Big or Die Trying
 
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Data registrazione: 10-12-2007
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Predefinito The verde

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4472533/
Synergistic anticancer activity of biologicals from green and black tea on DU 145 human prostate cancer cells

Conclusions
Combining lower concentrations of EGCG and TF results in greater cell death compared to either extract alone at the same concentration. Also, increased cell death rates were statistically significant compared to controls.



http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4276154/

The association of tea consumption and the risk and progression of prostate cancer: a meta-analysis
Conclusion

To sum up, our meta-analysis suggested that regardless of tea type, tea consumption might be a potential protective factor for the PCa, especially in China and India. Tea consumption might play a protective role in low-grade PCa. However, because of the small number of included studies, more relevant studies are needed to further explore this association


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20924968

Green tea and cancer prevention.
Abstract
Extracts of green tea and green tea polyphenols have exhibited inhibitory effects against the formation and development of tumors at different organ sites in animals. These include animal models for skin, lung, oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, intestine, colon, liver, pancreas, bladder, mammary gland, and prostate cancers. In addition to suppressing cell proliferation, promoting apoptosis, and modulating signaling transduction, green tea polyphenols, especially (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, also inhibit cell invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. This article reviews data on the cancer preventive activities of green tea polyphenols, possible mechanisms involved, and the relationship between green tea consumption and human cancer risk

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3142888/

Cancer and metastasis: prevention and treatment by green tea

Conclusions and perspectives
The possible cancer-preventive activity of green tea constituents has been studied extensively and the amount of experimental evidence documenting the properties of green tea, which affects multiple signaling pathways (Fig. 1) against metastasis of cancer is increasing rapidly. Metastasis is responsible for most deaths due to cancer and therefore, therapeutic strategies to prevent development of metastases have potential to impact on cancer mortality. However, a better understanding of the biology and molecular events of the metastatic process is required for the development of these therapies. In successfully treating cancer, focus should be on combating metastasis formation and growth. Significant improvements in early detection of cancer and development of effective novel therapeutic strategies targeting metastasis will help improve patient outcome. A better approach for the treatment of cancer seems to be the development of strategies to treat tumor cells and to modulate the host microenvironment. For better understanding of the interaction of green tea, employment of more specific and sensitive methods with more representative models of metastasis in conjunction with the development of good predictive biomarkers are required. Well-designed clinical and intervention trials will give the clear picture about the protective effects of green tea against metastasis of cancer.
__________________
Moderation in bodybuilding is a vice, moderation in discipline is a failure. (Dorian Yates)

Successful individuals view mistakes as valuable tools for self-correction that motivate them to actively seek the knowledge necessary for further mastery. (Mike Mentzer)


Ultima modifica di taker_83 : 07-11-2015 alle ore 11.49.23.
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Vecchio 08-11-2015, 17.06.21   #7
Kaamos
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ci penso, mi informo, ripasso.
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